. . . they were soooooooo cute. Sure, they’re cute now, but there’s just something about old photos and such of my children when they were two and three and four years old. I have some videos that were made of two of my kids fifteen years ago. They were shot using a video cam on Hi8 tape. I’m converting the videos to MP4 format and storing them to an external hard disk. Eventually, the idea is to take short sections, like highlights, and make a movie that can be burned to DVD.

So I set up a folding table in the music room/study of our home, and lined equipment up along it for the process. I’m sitting here now, with my MacBook Air, while the video camera plays to the MacBookPro, which is converting a Christmas eve video from 2001 to an mp4 file. And those two kids are just adorable, in there one-piece pajamas and colorful socks. My boy would have been five, my daughter a few days short of four. They’re playing together on the living room floor of the home we lived in while in Ann Arbor, Michigan. They’re talking to one another, playing so nicely. In the next scene they’re helping clean things up as we all get ready for bed.

Not don’t get me wrong, these two are still adorable as high schoolers. Well, maybe not adorable. Perhaps good looking, well-mannered. My boy is on the varsity wrestling team, my daughter plays for the State Champion Girls Basketball team. They do well in school. They have friends; they go out once and a while. They’re quickly becoming adults. But occasionally, like all siblings I suppose, they argue with each other, they don’t always pick up their things, and just don’t always cooperate. They’re not babies anymore. They don’t look at me with awe anymore. They don’t hang upon every word. They’re experienced in the things relative to the high school world. In defense of them, they are growing up. No longer are they dry sponges awaiting water that I pour. They think for themselves, have their own particular taste in clothing and music. They’re becoming there own persons.

But clearly in our relationship to our Heavenly Father, we are to remain like we were when we were children. We are to be in awe of Him. We are to hang upon every word. We are to develop and grow in Him, and in Him alone. Our taste is to be His taste. We are to emulate the model He provided for us when He came from Heaven to Earth. We are each unique, sure. We are each our own persons, within the boundaries of G-d’s Will for us, yes. But we don’t “know everything,” so we accept His way in our lives.

If we are not little children to the Father we have in Heaven, then we must be converted and become one.

‘I assure you,’ Y’shuaJesus said, ‘unless you are converted and become like children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.’

Matthew 18:3

Matthew Henry put it this way: “Children, when very young, do not desire authority, do not regard outward distinctions, are free from malice, are teachable, and willingly dependent on their parents. It is true that they soon begin to show other dispositions, and other ideas are taught them at an early age; but these are marks of childhood, and render them proper emblems of the lowly minds of true Christians. Surely we need to be daily renewed in the spirit of our minds, that we may become simple and humble, as little children, and willing to be the least of all. Let us daily study this subject, and examine our own spirits.”

Lord Bless, Keep, Shine. . .